Hôtel Bachaumont, Paris >> A Parisian Neighbourhood Hotel, Bar & Restaurant

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Let’s go back in time to the Roaring Twenties in Paris. The Grand Hôtel de Bachaumont in the heart of Montorgueil was an institution in the French capital. It takes its name from Louis Petit de Bachaumont, a controversial writer who disclosed sordid secrets about 18th century France in his “Mémoires Secrets”.

Celebrities, doctors, society and traders flocked to the hotel for its great location by Les Halles. But when the largest market in France moved to Rungis, the hotel was left deserted and became the Clinique Bachaumont. Fast forward a century to the Hotel Bachaumont being restored to its former glory. Months of extensive work have given it back its heart and soul. The façade has been painstakingly restored, the age-old Hotel Bachaumont wording engraved in the stone has been brought to light, the wrought iron entrance doors have been refurbished. Hotel Bachaumont has brought its age-old charm into the 21st century.

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“The idea was to put a fresh twist on classic Paris chic and create a contemporary hotel that’s true to its city and neighbourhood.” Dorothée Meilichzon, CHZON

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Before you read my rather long post, I must add a disclaimer that I only just uncovered which makes for a better understanding of the set up at this new hotel Bachaumont. The reason I paid (yes paid) to check in for the weekend was because I knew it was designed by Dorothee Chzon, and understood the hotel is run by the Experimental Group, owners and operators of Grand Pigalle, Experimental Beach in Ibiza, Compagnie des Vin Surnaturels in Paris, London and New York amongst other fabulous eateries and watering holes. After such a wonderful weekend at Grand Pigalle earlier this year I was eager to compare the two.

The hotel is owned by La Clé Group (they facilitate the operations of the hotel which opened this Summer 2015) and the Experimental Group run the beautiful Restaurant Bachaumont and cocktail bar, Night Flight on the ground floor. Then it all falls into place. The personal touches you felt in the rooms at Grand Pigalle were missing here.

I rarely share my frustrations, but sometimes a few things I think need to be mentioned for the benefit of the next guests. The design execution is slick, but more on that in a moment (and minus the noisy service door next to our bedroom which was used throughout the night just needs its soft-close tightening a bit) the hotel changes vibe once you are in your room.

The small touches I remembered from Grand Pigalle (37 rooms compared to 49 +4 suites at Bachaumont) were missing here.

That pre-mixed cocktail waiting for you in your mini bar on arrival (here it was a soft drinks only situation at Bachaumont with no glasses or corkscrew) not very sexy for a ‘weekend away’ kind of set up. Especially for a hotel collaborating with the Experimental Group. Or if that was because we were in a Superior Room (second lowest category) even so, all mini bars should be the same and fully stocked. This is the city of love for crying out loud.

Or how about a note welcoming you to the hotel (a standard greeting nowadays no?). Our room was small, which is fine by me, but with a few touches I appreciated included a suitcase rack, double quantities of bathroom products, huge towels and dressing gown all ticked the boxes for me. All bathrooms should have doors that seal shut, our fold door didn’t offer much privacy in a small room.

I read a recent review about Bachaumont following my overnight stay. They noted that the turn down service, and breakfast were both faultless. My room didn’t have a turndown service whilst we dined in the restaurant downstairs (or they forgot us, and at a room rate of 420€ that’s not good in my book).

When I arrive at a new hotel, I like to be informed of all the facilities and timings. When does service end in the restaurant, is there a spa or gym (believe so but wasn’t made aware), or anything I can enjoy when I am in the hotel. I never want to miss a thing. Apparently because of new staff on my day of check in, I was a little misinformed about a couple of things, mainly breakfast timings and the Sunday brunch.

The weekend we stayed, my boyfriend was taking part in the Paris to Versailles run, so as a good girlfriend I sat with him whilst he had an early breakfast, before heading back to bed and returning to the restaurant before the cut off time of 11.30am (not unrealistic for a Sunday breakfast I thought, great a lie in!). Wrong, it finished at 10.00am. I strolled down at 11am with a Swiss friend joining me for breakfast to see the whole spread cleared away. Shame, and also a photo opportunity lost to share with you all how pretty it looked 3 hours earlier.

The staff managed to find me a croissant and coffee where I sat amongst them setting up for lunch. Next frustration. I go back to my room, pack, check-out, and leave past the restaurant to see the most amazing looking Sunday Brunch with DJ kicking off just as I am leaving. For 4€ more than the cost of breakfast (20€) the team could have said hey don’t worry about breakfast, come and join in with the Sunday brunch. Next time i’m in Paris I’d love to go back for that alone. I wish the hotel could have shared that and I would have planned to stay for it. I wonder how many other weekend guests who have to check out at midday miss knowing about this also? Now, on to the happy side…

How totally fabulous was our Saturday night at the bar, a cocktail at Night Flight and dinner in the  restaurant, Bachaumont. A dear friend was holding her birthday dinner at Bachaumont, so my only request to E was to share a cocktail together before everyone arrived, so I could soak up the ambience and people watch. It seemed this was a locals place, and I love that. As a stream of friends arrived I knew we were going to enjoy our Saturday night here.

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In tribute to the night travellers and in reference to the book by Saint-Exupéry, the guys at the Experimental Group decided to call the bar Night Flight. The bar offers multiple sharing tables, cozy corners or a spot at the wooden, copper and marble bar, to watch all the action.

A painter has created a little black and white pattern by hand on the large wooden panels. Copper velvet seating, totem coffee tables in black wood, curvaceous pouffes, lozenge lamps reminiscent of the hotel’s logo, carpet patterned with Montorgueil cobbles, and a traditional white marble fireplace.

Swarms of fabulous Parisians flowed in and out from the bar to restaurant and I was excited to dine with all our friends.

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Our set menu for the evening offered a great slice of what the hotel has to offer. Some referenced it was like sitting in the dining room of the guys who run the place. Lively, colourful, the team where on hand to share news of new cocktails and offer their thoughts on wine pairings. The simple menu with seemingly standard dishes (devilled eggs, leeks vinaigrette etc) take on a brasserie style to put a fresh and modern spin on the most iconic and classic dishes.

The restaurant has been restored to its former glory with large spaces, an open kitchen and large glass roof. Featuring Gubi Beetle chairs and banquette seating, and a large backgammon-inspired dining table forming the nerve centre of the restaurant.

Moody walls feature extensive carpentry and countless wooden mouldings and tilted mirrors. True to her style, Dorothée Meilichzon has used countless patterns and fabrics on the chairs and seating combinations. Handmade designs adorn the marble mosaic floor around the counter with the same pattern as the Montorgueil cobbles and gold tiles which tend to catch the light.

Perfect service and a great atmosphere. We certainly weren’t the last table to leave at it was 1.45am. You can see the conservatory by night below, and a view to our room above.

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Our room by night below (buy the chair here)

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The ground floor is filled with interesting books to borrow and return…

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Our Superior Room below

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The architectural motif taken from the building’s main door has been updated to adorn the floor and carpets, and is etched into the bedside tables.

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The view from our window

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Some images of the restaurant by day below

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Screen Shot 2015-10-03 at 10.23.01

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Various room categories at Hotel Bachaumont

All the furniture has been custom made, such as marble and wooden desks, head boards (fabric by Frey, a local institution on Rue du Mail), counters, bedside tables, retro wall lamps, Stilnovo lighting, and medley of Art Deco inspiration.

The Bachaumont and Montorgueil Suites Below

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An executive Room below

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Executive Room bathroom above

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Thank you to Emmanuelle Gillardo at Agence 14 septembre, Paris & the Experimental Group.

Restaurant / bar Le Bachaumont Tel : + 33 1 81 66 47 50 Night Flight : +33 1 81 66 47 55 www.restaurantbachaumont.com hotel / http://www.hotelbachaumont.com

 Images LWSY & Paul Bowyer